Sunday Morning Victory


On a Sunday morning along Victory, east of Kester, the wide street is mostly empty.

It is also empty on Van Nuys Boulevard.

And the only person on Friar Street pushes a shopping cart with her belongings.


Under the dull fog, Van Nuys might be sleeping late.

Sleeping off Cervezas.

Many work on Sundays, but some do not.


Here are sidewalks without trees or humans.


Cars speed past the ghosts of late The Modern Era.


Where medical doctors practiced the most advanced medicine in 1960.


Eisenhower, Kennedy and Johnson were the Presidents.


And confident young builders hired talent young architects and erected thin paneled office buildings along thriving and newly widened Victory Boulevard.


Men worked at jobs back then. They wore suits.


Women smoked and wore high heels and lipstick and gloves and called themselves ladies.


And kids got in trouble, riding skateboards on the sidewalk or chewing gum in class.


It was a troubled time when blacks were called negroes.


And men were sent off to fight war in Vietnam.


But Van Nuys was still fine, still humming along: safe, secure and industrious.


We live in a rich nation. But all around us, people sleep on benches, and push their belongings in shopping carts.

People sleep on the sidewalk in front of the Chase Bank which has assets of $2.6 trillion and is the largest bank in the United States.

They are sleeping under the arches of the Marvin Braude Center, seat of the government of the City of Los Angeles in the San Fernando Valley.


Marvin Braude Center
Marvin Braude Center

Marvin Braude Center
Marvin Braude Center
And what you see today can break your heart.



Friar St. at VNB

Along Friar Street

Friar at Sylmar

Victory Bl.

Victory Bl.

Anna & Vartan: Victory Bl.

Victory Bl.

Victory Bl.

Victory Bl.

Victory Bl.

Victory Bl.

Victory Bl.

Friar St.

Friar St. View SE

Friar St.

State of the Union

Chicago, IL
South Side

“Tonight, I propose a “Fix-It-First” program to put people to work as soon as possible on our most urgent repairs, like the nearly 70,000 structurally deficient bridges across the country. And to make sure taxpayers don’t shoulder the whole burden, I’m also proposing a Partnership to Rebuild America that attracts private capital to upgrade what our businesses need most: modern ports to move our goods; modern pipelines to withstand a storm; modern schools worthy of our children. Let’s prove that there is no better place to do business than the United States of America. And let’s start right away.

Part of our rebuilding effort must also involve our housing sector. Today, our housing market is finally healing from the collapse of 2007. Home prices are rising at the fastest pace in six years, home purchases are up nearly 50 percent, and construction is expanding again.

But even with mortgage rates near a 50-year low, too many families with solid credit who want to buy a home are being rejected. Too many families who have never missed a payment and want to refinance are being told no. That’s holding our entire economy back, and we need to fix it. Right now, there’s a bill in this Congress that would give every responsible homeowner in America the chance to save $3,000 a year by refinancing at today’s rates. Democrats and Republicans have supported it before. What are we waiting for? Take a vote, and send me that bill. Right now, overlapping regulations keep responsible young families from buying their first home. What’s holding us back? Let’s streamline the process, and help our economy grow.” -Barack Obama, State of the Union Address, 2/13/13